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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
cost, u.n. basic needs exposing [speaker not understood] obliged by law for humanity to promote free speech propagation, [speaker not understood] for human and environmental marketing ownership and production, socialist capitalism, [speaker not understood], fascism. two centuries, republican democratic bodies, ability to gain, plan, life, death, whisper, come together, constitutional democracy. but aged emotional symphonic [speaker not understood], pointing had i finger to an introduction to a [speaker not understood] in logic. * his finger >>> good afternoon. good afternoon, president chiu and supervisors. ♪ you know that i would be untrue you know that i would be a city liar if i was to say to you this city couldn't get much higher come on city lit the city fire city, city lit the city fire sfgtv graphics go onset the city night on fire ♪ you know that it would be untrue you know you got to make peace awhile then you can really smile and make it really noaa while come on city light the city with the city fire come on city light the city fire [speaker not understood] ♪ you k
delegation, six democrats. pennsylvania law speak to the apportioning process. the republican-controlled legislature essentially redrew the congressional boundary lines, moving some seats that were vulnerable in the eastern part of the state, three of them in at the philadelphia suburbs, one of them, one of them in the lehigh valley and one of them up in scranton. basically running the west and south to try to pick up more republicans without getting into the details of it -- karen lives in one of those areas where the boundary lines were redrawn. i do not know which congressman -- that might be in the 15th, with charlie dent. that was the lehigh valley seat. then out comes down to south central pennsylvania. or she could be in a seat held by a republican, lou barletta. that district was redrawn -- that district now comes the whole way down to the state capital, picking up more republicans. here is a way to think about that at the moment -- in competitive terms. nobody believes, independent analysts, nobody believes that of the 18 congressional seats, that more than two of the
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
. >> an arrest made in connection with a fire at the law offices of the vallejo mayor >> and the training exercise drawing people from around the world to right here. >> the news starts right now. this is ktvu mornings on 2. >> good morning. welcome to mornings on two. it's saturday october 27th. >> let's check in with rosemary for a quick look at what to expect. >> yes. good morning. its going to be a pleasant day. we are still waiting for the break of dawn but mostly clear skies. it's a cool saturday in some cases but not as much as yesterday. mostly sunny, mild to warm, on the flip side more wet weather on the way. it could come in time for halloween. >> following developing news out of san francisco right now. a woman is badly injured after a shooting and a car crash. >> reporter: it happened just before four this morning in city's western edition neighborhood. according to a detective a 30- year-old woman who was driving this car, you see flipped over -- that's now in the process of getting towed. she was shot four times and while on the way to the hospital she said she had bee
, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented walking on egg shells, terrified they are going to say some word that's going to be deemed, you know, an incipient klan sentiment and that's why the crux of my book is the turning point of the o.j. verdict when i think white america saw black people cheering the acquittal of an obviously guilty black celebrity and said that's it, the white guilt bank is shut down. not only did that help race relations, it specifically helped black people as republican policies that had been pushed for years but demagogued as racist, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented helping black people most of all. i mean, helping everyone but helping -- giuliani's policies in new york saved tens of thousands of black lives and i don't know if he would have been able to continue with his very tough on crime policies which were in fact demagogued as racist while he was implementing them, if you didn't have this change in feeling in america where people were just sick of hearing of being accused of racism. >> let's ta
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
to all those whose hearts be true. here by the city of law by the bay, [speaker not understood] the animals, almighty say. free them all the mother of boycotts president bradford bell the call. -- be the call. i tell you, i love you all and [speaker not understood] is going to toss you off the golden gate bridge, i wouldn't allow it not unless you have life jackets. regarding the giantsv, the story of the day is pitcher who was speaking on behalf of human trafficking in palo alto in two days. and let me touch upon sheriff mirkarimi, he's been given a reprieve so i would encourage you to see [speaker not understood] any negatives and allow him and help him so that he may now be involved in with the second opportunity to clear the case of kevin cohen. for myself and ted gunderson, we were the guardian, we gave them the information can they refuse to print it. we have dan noyes an investigative reporter for kgo that refuses to investigate. he's disregarded all the information he's been given over the last year and a half and he wants to do something with some secondhand informatio
if he's elected president. talking about cutting the budget, eliminating the president's health care law and tapping into domestic energy resources. i have to tell you the one message that they have been hitting hard in the last final days of this campaign, they have been going after the president on this issue of bipartisanship. mitt romney is making the case that the president has forgotten his mandate to be a uniter in this country. the president said people should be voting because it is the best revenge. mitt romney has been telling crowds all day long that people should be voting out of what they think is best for the country in their heart. so that is the message that they've been delivering all day long. i can also tell you that the front of the campaign plane we have seen a higher number of top campaign advisers flying with the gop nominee including michael levitt who has been leading the readiness project, as they skaul it. i talked to governor levitt for just a few brief moments in iowa and he said what they've been doing is building a ship, he called it, that they hope will s
party, the republican party is not a choice on the ballot. with the voter i.d. law, all they want to do is disenfranchise the voter. okay? the republican party but the libertarian party through hell, to be honest with you. just to get 1% of the boat off the ballot. -- of the vote off. the libertarian party never got more than 1% of the votes nationally and i think it's ridiculous. i have volunteered for the libertarian party. they were arguing over signatures. what a waste of time and taxpayers' money because that had to all go in to the courts. host: terry madonna, third parties and the pennsylvania ballot. guest: gary johnson will be on the ballot house will -- as will jill stein of the green party. pennsylvania can write someone in. we will essentially have four two choices. host: the headline this morning from "the philadelphia inquirer ." joining us is the politics writer from "the enquirer." thank you for being with us. share with us these polling numbers. how many did you survey and what are the results? caller: it was a survey of 600 likely voters all last week, tuesday through
, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has been more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money, about 60% of the outside money, has been raised from about 200 individuals. the number of people you could fit on an airplane have respecta small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money
martial law 107 24 3, domestic terrorism act of 2002, to order the troops home tomorrow. they can't come home because they're tripped. but at least the average idiot voter would have then another decisive issue between a guy who wants to maintain mass murder and a guy who wants to end it. and this legislative body is perhaps the most powerful on earth because you have a chance to influence the shadow president of the united states, my friend willie brown, when he becomes vice president of the united states [speaker not understood] organized crimes for 9/11 friendly plan, and you can break agenda today, the brown act allows you to do that to make an emergency request for the president of the united states to order our troops home under martial law [speaker not understood], which will end 77 unconstitutional wars since world war ii and get him reelected. i think he'd like that. thank you for listening. >> thank you. next speaker. we're switching the microphone. now you can go. >>> my name is paulette brown and i'm here again i'm going to show the video i've been showing every week concerni
for law and order so they can bring aid to those affected by the conflict. the agency says more than 28,000 people have been forced out of their homes in the e latest wave of fighting. it's clearly urgent that law and order be restored so that violence can be prevented and so that access is facilitated for aid to be delivered to those in need. >> the latest outbreak of violence between buddhists and muslims in the state of rakine has continued since october 21st. the local government says that at least 84 people have been killed. the conflict first erupted earlier this year after a group of muslims allegedly assaulted a buddhist woman. the united nations is suppes trefugees in the cy area. >> the camps in and around sitwe are already hosting most of the 75,000 people who remain displaced in the wave of violence that broke out in june this year. with a new influx these already crowded camps are being stretched beyond capacity in terms of space, shelter, and basic supplies. >> meanwhile, the association of southeast asian nations is promising to respond to conflict in one of its member co
and told his story. phillip congatonda went to law school and graduated hastings law school but never actually practiced law. he became the first chronicler of the japanese american experience and is credited with broadening the japanese -- broadening the definition of theater by bringing jap needs american stories to stages all across the country. he has collaborated with the most diverse american theater venues, from large mainstream houses to the most experimental venues to african american ethnic cally specific theaters reaching extraordinarily diverse audiences. from here to japan, his acclaimed sisters, maximoto premiered in 2005. in the last couple years he worked with camposanto on a fist of roses on male violence and an orchestral composition. many of his plays are collected in month more cherry blossoms published by washington press. among his awards are the civil liberties public education fund and lila wallace reader's digest award. phillip is also a respected independent film maker whose film recently premiered at sundance, but we're here to talk about his upcoming produc
common ground to make sure our tax laws are more competitive and simple. if we do that, i think we will send a message to the world america is open for business again. >> i think what the audience sought is he was asked a question about his senate record and he was talking about being governor. he is running for reelection to the united states senate. he had a fiscal irresponsibility. george came into the united states senate with historic surpluses. we were in great shape. by the time he left, we had massive deficits. he voted to increase the debt by $16,000 every second he was in the senate. he expanded medicare, which was good, but he did not pay for it. he was part of a senate and a house that declared two wars but did not pay for the wars and instead put them on the credit card for our kids to pay. he made a massive tax cuts to health -- to help the wealthy. he did not pay for them. we went from surplus to deficit. he voted four times to raise his own pay. he voted four times to raise the debt with it, he voted for 52,000 earmarks that totaled $121 billion. even george had to
, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented helping black people most of all. i mean, helping everyone but helping -- giuliani's policies in new york saved tens of thousands of black lives and i don't know if he would have been able to continue with his very tough on crime policies which were in fact demagogued as racist while he was implementing them, if you didn't have this change in feeling in america where people were just sick of hearing of being accused of racism. >> let's take a little break now we've warmed you up, because you called the president a retard this week. you're laughing. most people aren't. let's discuss it after the break. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp dicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps cover
on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the state of new hampshire. is it possible that there could be a recount in this state and what are the rules for that? guest: we have specific rules for the state. we have a fine secretary of state, bill gardner, quite experienced in this. he's the person who has been the keeper of the flame for the new hampshire primary. we had a famous account here in the late '70's with senator john durken who recently passed away. frankly, i don't see it coming down to that. we will see what happens on tuesday. i think other states may be more likely to have a recount and new hampshire. host: do you have voter id laws? guest: yes, and there's some controversy. the legislature passed a voter -- a new voter law that required people to swear that if there were going to vote in a certain town that they would pay their taxes and their registration fees for their cars in that town, etc. this was appealed and the state supreme court has put that on hold. right now some of our voters are slightly confused about those issues going into tuesday. ho
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
on shore about 30 miles from rehoboth to, in new jersey. my state, where my in-laws used to live, where my brothers and sisters live, they were hit pretty badly. i have a sister in law and family who live in ocean city, new jersey. you saw how badly they were hit. it is kind of amazing -- it is kind of amazing. a call yesterday with all the governors and mayors, it warmed my heart. you had the governor of delaware, the governor of connecticut, the governor of pennsylvania, democrats and republicans, and they were hurt. the governor of maryland. all saying to new jersey and new york -- look, if you need extra resources, we will send you ours. we will send you hours. listen on the telephone, hearing the mayor of the big city, not only mayor bloomberg, who is one hell of a fine guy, mayor bloomberg of new york. mayor booker of newark, hoboken -- hear these guys talking, they are all offering each other help. offering each other help. democrats and republicans, acting like democrats and republicans are supposed to act. [applause] ladies and gentlemen. we are always, i know this sounds almost t
of family life so the rest of us can feel safe. my son-in-law is currently on his eighth deployment. my daughter is in special operations are my heroes. here is part of their everyday. although my name is listed as writing a chapter in this book, i cannot take all the credit. i was still so broken at a time of disaster at the rate the difficulty expressing myself. isn't that for my husband, gary, mathews went to reset comments high school sweetheart to work with them on the student council and his naval academy friend, matthew stories would not have been without their input and i deeply think them for their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrifice and the love of country and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest literary source in the world. freedom isn't free. god bless our military family and god bless america. [applause] >> thank you, lisa, thank you, mrs. freeman. war brings us our own weakness, but to the challenges we face over the past 10 years of war, we also got stronger. and the seth ly
by the military in war zones and are controversial. but they are also increasingly used by law enforcement here at home. we have a demonstration here from the east bay. >> reporter: by definition is it a drone? about louis lit. it is like -- absolutely. it is likely you will see more drones like this over active crime scenes. >> search and rescue missions, etc. >> reporter: a gunman in vallejo who killed an officer could have had this equipment helping. >> it would have been a lot better to deploy one of these unmanned aerial systems and see where the man was hide that way. >> they can cost up to $1,500 an hour for powered aircraft. >> reporter: that seem to be big money and part of orthopedics urban shield. the drone comes quipped with high technology accessories like nice vision, high-tech cameras and they even see heat. >> they can save people in the middle of the night. >> reporter: once considered an expensive toy is seriously considered as a cleaner, safer, and less expensive way to save lives. report from dublin, cbs 5. >>> why are schools always on the chopping block when it come to
rate of any country in the world. 2.3 million people. half of what we spend on law enforcement, the court and the prisons is drug related, and to what end. look, this is not about advocating drug use. 50% of kids graduating from high school have smoked marijuana. that's an issue that belongs with families, not in the criminal justice system. [applause] >> anybody have any rebuttal? >> i have to make my statements first, and then my rebuttal. so as a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years, i can say with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to o
u.s. laws. is that true? joining us now jay secula the chief counsel for the american center for law and justice. they are coming from places like kazakhstan to texas and iowa and other states to make sure that we run free and fair electionses, jay, and they say if texas, as its threatened to do tries to arrest them or get up in their business, if they get out of line they can't. what is the truth? >> yeah, that's because the state department says there is this. you know, basically immunity situation almost like diplomatic immunity. this sounds like a scripp from a borat movie. the reality is. megyn: kazakhstan. >> observers from the osc which are in cooperation with the united nations are taking a serious position of questioning the integrity of the united states electoral process, and belaruse which is like the last remaining dictatorship in europe sent a specific statement complaining about our electoral college, the way our elections are seupt. i'm going to read you the response from the u.s. mission. this is our u.s. mission responding to belaruse a dictatorship. the united stat
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
of issues with law enforcement, particularly the issue of creating a funnel for narcotics trafficking within 5 miles of the new mexico border. there are hundreds of new mexicans who have signed petitions that saying, please do not do this. you are ignoring them. you are not going to find a solution that way. >> let's move on to the next question. >> in 2007, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators reached a tentative compromise on immigration reform. but even with president bush's support, the compromise collapsed. most agree we need immigration reform. what reforms do yoou support? and how would you get the senate to approve immigration reform when such a bipartisan group could not? representative wilson. >> it is separate from border security. the united states has to have effective control of our borders. the number of people crossing the border illegally has gone down because of the resources that we put in there since 2005. that is a good thing. the people who are still crossing tend to be heavily armed narco traffickers and human traffickers. it's very dangerous. with respect to immigratio
nobody speaks about the intelligence blunder the republicans did that put us in a war with raq, law 2000 american soldiers, and their answer was they had poor intelligence. secondly, my question is, why should anybody believe that governor romney would be good at creating jobs what he was 48 in job guest: well, i'll take the question first. governor romney in the middle oh f a tough economy created almost 50,000 new jobs in massachusetts. let's remember. >> on "washington journal" tomorrow morning we'll look at virge. >> now we'll go to jacksonville florida where mitt romney is to speak shortly. he is with jeb bush. >> you ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries"? this is an important election. this an election about what the future of america is going to be. is our future going to be more debt and more regulation and more taxes? sor our future going to be in less taxes, less regulations and. nibble mitt romney. he's the right candidate at the right time to be
every single day. the very first law put an obama signed with the lily ledbetter. the president and vice- president know how important it is for women to make our own decisions about our own bodies, our own health care. [applause] so many women of my generation have fought hard for roe versus wade, access to contraception and for equal rights. we don't want out daughters and granddaughters to have to go back and fight the same battles that we fought decades ago. [applause] we cannot forget about the importance of the supreme court in the direction this country could take. finally, i care about this country. about this election as a military mom. our son beau is a in the delaware national army guard and he served in a rack for a year. -- iraq for a year. i had the honor of meeting many of our troops and military families and i know how much they love our country. sacrificed to protect it. i want to make sure that all of our veterans and their families get the benefits they have earned and the respect they deserve. we have come so far but we have to keep moving forward. now it is my pleasu
th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years because what you have to pay will be determined by what you are making, not the other way around. [cheers and applause] believe it or not, over 10 years this cost you $6 billion less than the old system. -- $60 billion less than the old system. the president and congress allocated at $60 million to increasing the pell grants every year for a decade to keep up with inflation and maintaining the tuition tax credits for middle-class families to help pay their kids way through college. this is unbelievable. here is wh
in giving back. we have done that you are life. my husband is in law enforcement. for many years i was an investigative reporter and fought public corruption. i spent the last 10 years of my career in health care, making sure it is accessible and we offer quality health care. this election will get down to parties i see this is a different set of priorities from where my husband and i come from and from what congressman schilling stands for. i pledge to give it my all and work on behalf of the middle class families that have been under attack by the last two years of congressman schilling's tenure. we have to make sure progress are there for students to go to college and the balance the budget with the right parity. not on the backs of the middle class but with the middle-class in mind. thank you very much. >> now it is time for questions from the panelists. >> welcome to both candidates tonight. congressman schilling, you are from colona and ms. bustos, from east moline/ those cities are 7 miles apart yet members will have to represent a district that is over 85 miles wide. how wo
liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservative, so we will get back to the middle point. based on what he just said, during the bush years, bush-cheney, the focus was foreign policy. guantÁnamo bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated the hatred on the left. for the right, it wasn't specifically foreign policy and civil liberties. we have a pre
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)